When not hunting, this bird generally flies between 40 and 60 mph. However, when diving to catch its prey, the peregrine falcon can reach speeds of up to 220 mph. Image source: Flickr.com; some rights reserved.

TWRA to draw names for limited falcon trapping

Bob, a one-year-old Peregrine falcon, flexes his wings in 2013 as Joanne Primo releases him on Antelope Island, Utah. Source: Flickr.com, some rights reserved.

The 2018 application period for the trapping of a peregrine falcon to be used in falconry is currently open but quite limited, according to the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.

When not hunting, this bird generally flies between 40 and 60 mph. However, when diving to catch its prey, the Peregrine falcon can reach speeds of up to 220 mph. Image source: Flickr.com; some rights reserved.

The number of permits to be allowed for the taking of peregrine falcons to be used in falconry has increased from one to five in 2018 as announced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The TWRA will award the permits to the winners of a draw to be held on Wednesday, Aug. 29.

Falconers may go to the Falconry Information and Application under the Law Enforcement section of the TWRA’s website to locate the print-ready application and also view the requirements. Resident and non-resident master and general falconers are eligible for participation in the draw. Completed applications must be postmarked by Wednesday, Aug. 15.

Another change this year is the permits will be allowed statewide. Previously, Peregrine falcons were only allowed to be taken from counties located in the TWRA’s Region I (West Tennessee). One permit had been issued for the past seven years in Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awarded Tennessee its first permit allowing the trapping of one Peregrine falcon for the use in falconry in 2011.

The population of Peregrine falcons, through state and federal conservation efforts, has recovered enough since their near extinction in the early 20th century to allow for a limited take of these birds for the use in falconry.

For more information, contact the TWRA’s Walter Cook at walter.cook@tn.gov or (615) 781-6647.

Peregrine Falcons are the largest falcon over most of the continent, with long, pointed wings and a long tail, according to allaboutbirds.org. Be sure to look at shape as well as size — long primary feathers give the Peregrine a long-winged shape. As with most raptors, males are smaller than females.Source: Flickr.com; some rights reserved.